How to Install Frostwire on Linux (non .deb or .rpm distros)

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Frostwire LogoThat title was a mouthful.

Frostwire is a P2P to client application that you can use to exchange files *wink wink* with other people *wink wink*. For the sake of this article we will ignore the *wink wink* part and stick with the installation process for those of us slumming it outside the world of Ubuntu/Debian and Fedora/Red Hat. Frostwire provides a .deb and .rpm on their website providing our Ubuntu/Debian and Fedora/Red Hat brethren with an easy way to integrate the Frostwire binary into their system.

The news is not all bad for the rest of us. Frostwire does have a .tar.gz file that does not require you to build the source. Instead there is a binary file named “frostwire” that can be run from wherever you extracted the file. For some this is good enough but I’d at least like to have it in my path so I can just type frostwire and it will launch. Is it too much to ask to have it in my menu too? It turns out it isn’t that hard to do just that.

First, you need to download the tar.gz file from http://www.frostwire.com. From here on out we will be working in the terminal so fire it up and do the following:

[chris@example ~]$ cd Downloads

[chris@example ~/Downloads]$ tar xvzf frostwire-6.3.5.noarch.tar.gz

This will give you a frostwire-6.3.5.noarch folder. You can change directory into that folder and type ./frostwire and you are good to go. Of course, if that is all you are looking for you wouldn’t be reading this. Now do the following:

[chris@example ~/Downloads]$ sudo cp -r frostwire-6.3.5.noarch /usr/share/frostwire

It is not essential to put the frostwire folder in a shared location but it does help if you have multiple accounts on your machine. No matter where you put it you are probably going to want to setup a frostwire.desktop file in /usr/share/applications so you can easily launch the app from your applications menu.

[chris@example ~/Downloads]$ sudo vim /usr/share/applications/frostwire.desktop

[Desktop Entry]
Version=1.0
Name=FrostWire
GenericName=P2P Bittorrent client
GenericName[es]=P2P cliente Bittorrent
Comment=Search and explore all kinds of files on the Bittorrent network
Comment[es]=Busque y explore todo tipo de archivos en la red Bittorrent
Exec=/usr/share/frostwire/frostwire %U
Icon=frostwire
Terminal=false
Type=Application
Categories=Network;FileTransfer;P2P;
MimeType=application/x-bittorrent;x-scheme-handler/magnet;
X-Ubuntu-Gettext-Domain=frostwire
X-AppInstall-Keywords=torrent
Keywords=P2P,BitTorrent,Torrent,FrostWire,Vuze,uTorrent,Transmission,Transfer,Cloud;

Depending on the icon theme you have installed you may need to download the frostwire icon and place in /usr/share/icons and give the full path of the icon.

That’s it! Now us slummers can “legally” exchange files with each other. *wink wink*

How to Create a Local Red Hat Repository

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Note: The server that serves as your repository should only serve as a repository.

There are many reasons you may want a local Red Hat Enterprise Linux repository. Bandwidth is a major factor as downloading updates from the Internet can be time and bandwidth consuming. Another reason may be that your servers are not connected to the Internet and thus need to get their updates from a local source. You may have a development environment that you would prefer to not spend money on licenses for but still need to update. Whatever your reason, this tutorial will walk you through the process of getting your local repository setup.

Install packages needed for the repositories

yum install yum-utils createrepo httpd Continue reading